“A far sea moves in my ear”: Sylvia Plath’s “Morning Song”

morning-song

Around this time last year, I wrote a quick poetry post to welcome our first niece into the world. I’m delighted to say that this week, we welcomed our second niece (the first on my husband’s side of the family)—she was unexpectedly early, but given her sweet countenance and perfect health, I suspect that, like a wizard, she arrived precisely when she meant to.

This week, then, I’m reading Sylvia Plath’s “Morning Song,” a poem that might remind parents out there of their own first mornings with little ones. This stanza in particular had me strolling down memory lane:

All night your moth-breath
Flickers among the flat pink roses. I wake to listen:
A far sea moves in my ear.

Welcome to the world, Eleanor Hermione!

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13 thoughts on ““A far sea moves in my ear”: Sylvia Plath’s “Morning Song”

  1. Oh, congratulations!! What wonderful news! My first-ever baby nephew arrived exactly one week ago, and it has been fantastic so far. He’s such a sweet little nugget. Congratulations on your two nieces, and welcome welcome to little Eleanor!

    • Thank you! We love the name 🙂
      Also, just FYI: this comment went to my spam folder for some reason (I unspammed it, obviously)—I heard this has been a problem with WordPress recently (and now I’m wondering if any of my comments have disappeared into spam folders).

  2. Sylvia Plath is unfathomable to me, but let’s leave that aside. This particular fragment is lovely. Babies are joyful news. Congratulations to your husband especially!

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